62d Pennsylvania Volunteers

Company D: Finlay Cadets
(Armstrong County)

62d  Pennsylvania Monument at Gettysburg


Company Origins and Demographics

Company D was recruited by Captain William C. Beck in Armstrong County. It is likely that he used Camp Orr, which had been established on the Fairground near Kittanning, to muster the company before it traveled to Pittsburgh to join the rest of the regiment. After arriving in the Washington, D.C. area for drilling, several members of Company D had an encounter with an important stranger.

The name of the company was the Finlay Cadets. In different documents the name is spelled both "Finlay and "Finley," sometimes both in the same document. The unit was named for John B. Finlay, a prominent business executive and lawyer who lived in Kittaning. Luther S. Dickey, in his regimental history of the 103d Pennsylvania, writes that John Borland Finlay was born in Ireland and educated at both Belfast and Leipzig, receiving both A. M. and PhD. degrees. He emigrated to the U.S. and became a Presbyterian pastor, serving in that capacity until shortly after he was married. He then was admitted to the bar and became an attorney. He became known as a cultured gentleman with a forceful personality. After the war broke out, under the title Colonel Finlay, he had supervisory authority in military affairs for Armstrong County. He was sanctioned by both the Pennsylvania governor and the Secretary of War to recruit troops, but he never received a commission to do so, so the title of colonel was self-inposed. In addition to recruiting them, he served as a patron for several military companies, funding, and outfitting them. The expense of outfitting them willingly fell to his business partner and father-in-law, J. E. Brown, who was known as one of the wealthiest citizens of Pennsylvania. In addition to his connection with Captain Beck's Finlay Cadets, Finlay was instrumental in the formation of the "Loyal Union Guards," that became Company K, led by J. A. Cline [Cline was one who spelled Finlay's name both ways in his memoir] and helped recruit, organize, and outfit the 78th and 103d Pennsylvania Regiments. Finlay was also largely responsible for lobbying the Secretary of War to authorize Camp Orr as a rendezvous camp and military training facility for Armstrong County. After its creation, Finlay served with J. E. Brown, in directing the commissary department of Camp Orr, which (but I am only speculating) might have been a lucrative endeavor. Dickey indicated that Finlay created contentiousness in the formation of the 103d. After Finlay secured the commanding officer post for the regiment for Lt. Col. T. F. Lehmann of the 62d, having never before shown any interest in commanding a company or regiment, when he became angered by Lehmann's failure to consult with him about several appointments, Finlay decided to assume command of the regiment himself. At the time of the dispute, no officers had yet been commissioned, and the governor himself stepped in to work out a compromise. Lehmann, with genuine military experience, was given command of the 103d regiment, and Finlay was made commander of Camp Orr. Just before the war broke out, Finlay became one of the early Pennyslvania oil speculators, and he continued to do so after the war.

An 1861 Map of Armstrong County has been made available online. It may be used to locate the residences of many of the volunteers from Company D. For example, in Monroe Township are the names W. Barrett, Jas. Buckley, H. Callen, andThos. Truitt, which all could represent families of volunteers in Company D.

The average age at enrollment of the officers was 23.6 years old. The average age of the privates was 22.4 years old. Thirty-one of the volunteers listed their age as 18 or younger. Only ten of the volunteers were 30 or over. The oldest soldier was Samuel Bowler, who was 45, and the oldest officer was 40-year old Sergeant William Hagerson, who enlisted together with his son Asa. The musicians were not underaged drummer boys, but aged 18 and 21, unless they lied about their age. The most common occupation by far was farmer (43). There were ten involved with education, either as teachers or students. No other occupation had as many as ten, but some of the other occupations reflected the rural nature of the region where the volunteers were recruited: miner, laborer, carpenter, blacksmith, furnance man, wagoner, and teamster. The one volunteer who listed himself as an artist, Arthur Cassady, had his arm amputated after receiving a wound at Gettysburg.

Several volunteers from Elders Ridge, in neighoring Indiana County, joined the regiment together. Among them were Clark Coleman, John Reed Duncan, John Henderson, William Logan Reed, William and Matthew Smith, Christopher Stuchell, and John Watson. Some of them may have been classmates at the Elders Ridge Academy. John Henderson, the Smith brothers, and John Watson lived on neighboring farms. Henderson, Watson, and one of the Smith brothers were all born within a year of each other. Stuchell and the other Smith brother were both listed as 18 year old students. Henderson and the Smiths were cousins, and Duncan and Reed were cousins or slightly removed cousins.John Watson may also have been related to Henderson in some way.

Company Roster

Commissioned and Non-Commissioned Officers

Go to Privates and Musicians

All officers mustered in on 24 July 1861.

portrait of Captain William C. BeckWilliam C. Beck | Captain.
Captured at The Wilderness, 5 May 1864. Discharged 28 December 1864.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 24; Occupation: Teacher; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Light; Eyes: Brown; Complexion: Fair; Height: 5'7 1/2"

For more information about Beck, see this biographical sketch from a 1905 History of Crawford County Kansas. From this source, we learn that Beck was born on 26 April 1837. He was reared on a farm until he was thirteen when his father died. He was then bound out to a banker in Kittanning, and served as his bank clerk while also attending school. Other early jobs included store clerk, nailer in a rolling mill, and school teacher. He received an appointment to attend West Point, but only attended for about a year. That gave him enough military training to be sought after as a drilling instructor for various militias before he organized the Finlay Cadets. His marksmanship was so good that he won a gold medal just before the outbreak of the war in a contest between the rifle clubs of six counties of western Pennsylvania.

Bates indicates that he was captured at the Wilderness. The sketch provides additional details. "Beck was captured near Robinson's Tavern and taken as a prisoner to Macon, Georgia, where he was held until Atlanta fell; he was then kept at Savannah until the capture of that city, and was then moved to Charleston, where he and a large number of other officers who were prisoners were exposed to the fire of the Union army. Soon after, the yellow fever became epidemic at Charleston, and he was removed to Columbus, South Carolina, where, along with twelve hundred other officers, he received his welcome exchange. He had undergone the horrors of prison life for seven months, which was his most trying experience during the war. On December 19, 1864, he was mustered out at Washington, with a most creditable record as a gallant, fearless and efficient soldier."

After the war, Beck had quite a colorful and prosperous career. After initially returning to Kittanning to be a bookkeeper at his old bank, he was enticed by his brother, who had also been a captain in the war, to fight in Mexico against Maximilian. Somehow, however, before reaching Mexico, they decided to purchase cattle in Texas and start a cattle drive to Chicago. While in Kansas, in the midst of the cattle drive, they tried some land speculating and prospecting for coal. Somewhere on his exploits in Kansas, he met a 16 year old Hoosier, Sarah Houston, and married her. After reaching Chicago with his cattle (and new wife?), however, he returned to Pennsylvania. They remained in his home state for a dozen years and had one child before they returned to Kansas in 1883. He had purchased land in what became Pittsburg, Kansas, ten years before it was founded, and returning to the land as the new town was growing, he helped develop the community, prospered with it operating a grist mill, building a coal mining operation, and becoming a bank director. In the 1910 Census he listed his occupation as "Capitalist." According to pension index, Beck died in 1911 in Kansas. His widow was Sarah M. Beck.

An additional account of Beck is found in J. A. Cline's memoir of Company K, 155th P. V. Beck left West Point after two and a half years of service "owing to intolerance of Southerners who then were largely in majority and control of the Academy." Beck put his military training to good use, however. Cline describes being involved with a company of young men who took night lessons drilling in the use of musket and company movements. This company was led by Beck and may very well have been the forerunner to the Finlay Cadets. Cline notes that while traveling by horseback through the countryside in August 1862 to recruit volunteers for his company, one Sunday he met Capt. W. C. Beck, "who had previously drilled a number of us at the court house, and who had about completed the organization of a volunteer company called the "Finley Cadets [sic]." The was the time period between the Battle at Malvern Hill, which was fought in July, and the Second Battle at Bull Run, which was fought at the end of August 1862. Cline seems to be suggesting that Beck was on a recruiting foray, since the 62d had significant casualities at Gaines Mill and Malvern Hill. If so, he doesn't appear to have been very successful. The only soldier I can find that join in August off 1862 were Asa James Hagerson, whose father was already an officer in the company, and Henry A. Troutman. I have seen no indication that Beck was not present for any battles.


Ezra J. Putney | 1st Lieutenant
Resigned 30 October 1862, apparently because of ill health or injury. He died two months later.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 24; Occupation: Merchant; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Brown; Eyes: Blue; Complexion: Dark; Height: 5'5 1/2"

Born 31 July 1837. Died 30 December 1862. Buried in Putneyville Cemetery, Mahoning Twp., Armstrong Co., Pa

Robert S. Townsend | Sergeant; 2d Lieutenant; 1st Lieutenant
Promoted from Sergeant to 2d Lieutenant, 2 July 1862; promoted to 1st Lieutenant., 30 October 1862. Mustered out with company, 13 July 1864.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 26; Occupation: Professor; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Black; Eyes: Black; Complexion: Dark; Height: 5'7"

There is no indication in any record I have seen, but after Captain Beck was captured at the Wilderness, Townsend must have served in the capacity of the captain of the company the final months of the company's service.

The 1870 Census lists Robert Townsend in South Bend Township, Armstrong County, with wife Mary Hellen. His occupation is listed as Dry Goods Merchant (ret.). They had two children under the age of 5. Ten years later he was now a general merchant and four more children had been born.

According to the Biographical and Historical Catalogue of Washington and Jefferson College, 1902, Townsend was a teacher in Oakland, Mississippi, from 1856-59; a medical student in Apollo and Pittsburg in 1859-1860, a teacher in Wilsonville, Ky., from 1860-1861. After the war he was in the oil business from 1964 to 1866, a merchant in South Bend, Pa., from 1866 to 1887, and in Kansas City, Mo., in 1887. He married Helen Durett.

According to pension index, Townsend died in 1885. His widow, Mary H. Townsend, filed for the pension from Missouri.


William M. Duke | 2d Lieutenant
Resigned February 6, 1862.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 24; Occupation: Cabinet Maker; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Auburn; Eyes: Brown; Complexion: Fair; Height: 5'8"

The 1890 Veterans Schedules lists his home then as Rural Valley, Armstrong County. No disability is listed. According to pension index, Martha A. Duke filed for a widow's pension in 1918.


portrait of Lt. John D. ElderJohn D. Elder | 1st Sergeant; 2d Lieutenant
Promoted from 1st Sergeant to 2d Lieutenant., 7 February 1862. Killed at Malvern Hill, Va., 1 July 1862

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 23; Occupation: Law student ; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Brown; Eyes: Blue; Complexion: Fair; Height: 6'

According to the Biographical and Historical Catalogue of Washington and Jefferson College, 1902, Elder was born in Elder's Ridge, Pa., 18 November 1837, had been a teacher in Mississippi before returning to Pennsylvania as a law student at Washington College from 1856-1859.

portrait of Lt. Jefferson TruittJefferson Truitt | Sergeant; 2d Lieutenant
Promoted from Sergeant, 30 October 1862. Killed at Bethesda Church, Va. 3 June 1864. 

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 24; Occupation: Carpenter; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Brown; Eyes: Blue; Complexion: Fair; Height: 5'6"

See also a smaller image of the uncropped portrait that includes name, rank, and company written in. It is apparently the only known portrait of Truitt. According to family accounts, Jefferson Truitt, the company’s color sergeant at the Battle of Malvern Hill, rescued the regimental flag from capture by securing it inside his coat.

Buried in National Cemetery, Cold Harbor, Va; Section C. Truitt was from Kellersburg, in Armstong County, Pa.

Thomas Jefferson and David Truitt were brothers. In the 1850 Census for Madison Township, Armstrong County, Thomas J. (aged 13) and David R. N. Truitt (aged 9) are two of the children of Anderson and Sarah Truitt.

Daniel Swigart | Corporal; Sergeant; 1st Sergeant
Promoted from Corporal to Sergeant, 1 November 1862; promoted to 1st Sergeant, 5 May 1864. Mustered out with company, 13 July 1864.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 23; Occupation: Farmer; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Brown; Eyes: Brown; Complexion: Fair; Height: 5'9"

Swigart returned to Pennsylvania after the war. The 1890 Veterans Schedules lists his home then as Indiana, Pa. According to his record in the pension index, he filed for an invalid pension in 1890. In May 1928(?), a death benefit pension was filed for a "helpless child" dependent named John J. Swigart.

According to his Living Historian protrayer R.J. "Slim" Bowser, after the war Daniel Swigart became a Baptist minister and served Kittananing and many other western Pennsylvania communities. During his twenty years in the ministry, starting in 1870, he had
charge of nine churches. He died in Beaver Falls in 1921, and but was buried in the Pine Creek Baptist Cemetery, Kittanning. An article from the 12 September 1889 Pittsburg Dispatch describes the dedication of the 62d Pennsylvania's monument at Gettysburg, with Rev. Daniel Swigart opening the exercises at 2 o'clock with prayer, an indication that Swigart was a GAR chaplain.


Matthew M. Steele | 1st Sergeant
Discharged 9 September 1861, for chronic diarrhea.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: No personal information listed.

Listed in Bates as M. M. Steel, and "not of muster-out roll." Filed invalid pension in September 1889. Name also appears as Matthew Mc Steel in an 1890 veterans census.


portrait of Sgt. Sam CrawfordSamuel Neale Crawford | Corporal; Sergeant
Promoted from Corporal, 7 February 1862. On July 1, 1863 he was reported as slightly wounded at Gettysburg, and on July 2 he was reported as severely wounded in both legs. Mustered out with company, 13 July 1864.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 21; Occupation: Painter; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Brown; Eyes: Blue; Complexion: Fair; Height: 5'9"

Severaly wounded, he may have returned to the company sometime in 1864, a note in his pension index record indicates he was absent, returning from a hospital stay at muster out; his papers were left in Pittsburgh for him to pick up.

Other family records add his weight at 136 lbs. to the above personal information. On 6 September 1866 in Armstrong County, he married Rosanna Crum (also of Armstrong County), daughter of Captain Daniel Crum, who was killed near Winchester in 1864 (Co. B, 139th P.V.). They had three children. After the war Samuel worked as a painting and carpentry contractor. He filed for an invalid pension in 1881, when living in Armstrong County. Later applications for increases dating from 1916 through 1926 indicate he was living in Aspinwall, Pa. The 1890 Veterans Schedules lists his home as Manorville, Armstrong County, with no disabilities listed.

His three hospital stays and his later pension claim were not for wounds from Gettysburg but from a sprained back suffered in 1864. Both pension and Crawford family records indicate Samuel died in Allegheny Co. in 1929. Record in pension index indicate that he died on March 28, 1929. One contradictory report of his death comes from a notation in the Watson album, which indicates that he died of wounds at home in Kittaning. Where the confusion comes from, I do not know.

M. and W. appear as middle initial in some records.

Thanks to Ann Avery Hunter of Richmond, Virginia, for the additional information about Sergeant Samuel Crawford.


Reuben Bingaman | Corporal; Sergeant
Captured at Gainseville, 27 June 1862, on June 27th and 29th, 1862. Promoted from Corporal, 1 November 1862; absent, sick at muster-out .

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 24; Occupation: Furnace Man; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Brown; Eyes: Blue; Complexion: Dark; Height: 5'11"

Listed on register of Prisoners Received at C. S. Prison [Richmond?], but not sure how long he was held there.

Died in 1866 and was buried in Troxelville (Snyder County), Pa.


portrait of Sgt. William HagersonWilliam Hagerson | Sergeant.
Killed 5 May 1864 in the Wilderness; buried originally on the battlefield, then moved to the Frederickburg National Cemetery, grave #1278.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 40; Occupation: Shoemaker; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Light; Eyes: Blue; Complexion: Fair; Height: 6'1"

The story of his last battle, related by his granddaughter, Iva Hicks, shows the tragedy of war. In the midst of battle in the dense thickets of trees and brush, a forest fire broke out and becane the worst enemy that day. Blinding smoke and sufficating heat bore down on soldiers on both sides, and communication between company commanders was lost. In the confusion, Sergeant Hagerson was shot in the back of the head, unfortunately, it is believed, by one of his own men.

According to a New York Times article of May 1864, Hagerson may have been wounded at the Wilderness, but killed several days later when wounded soldiers trying to cross the river to Fredricksburgh, were fired upon by a party of bushwhackers. After a description of the encounter, Hagerson is listed among the killed.

Born on 5 July 1820, William was a shoemaker before the war and had served as a justice of the peace in 1846. After he and Mary Magdalen King were married in 1844, they settled near Miller's Eddy. They had eight children, including Pvt. Asa Hagerson, also of Company D. Records from the Hiles-Snow Cemetery in Perry Township confirm that William was married to Mary M. Hagerson, 1822-1913. Mary outlived not only her husband but several of her children: Curtis, 1847-1902; Melinda d. 18 Jul 1871, aged 20 yrs., 4 mos., 21 days; Silas d. 18 May 1871, aged 22 yrs., 3 mos.; William d. 11 Aug 1865, aged 10 yrs., 9 mos.

The 1890 Veterans Schedules for Perry Township, Armstrong County, lists his widow Mary's residence as West Monterey, Clarion County.

Two letters written by Hagerson while he was in winter camp have been preserved, as has a portrait of father and son in uniform.

Thanks to Mildred Loose and Mrs. Charles Hillard for information about the Hagerson family. Portraits of Sergeant William and Private Asa Hagerson, plus a letter written by William were provided by William's great-great-granddaughter, Mildred R. Loose. Her essay written for the Brady's Bend Historical Society Newspaper in 1994 has also been consulted.


William H. Smith | Sergeant.
Promoted to Sergeant, 21 March 1862. Wounded at Malvern Hill. Transferred to Company G of the 10th Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 19; Occupation: Farmer; Residence: Indiana Co.; Hair: Brown; Eyes: Blue; Complexion: Fair; Height: 5'9"

In a biography of General Alexander Hays, Smith was quoted in 1913 crediting the then-Colonel Hays with saving his life: "Suffering from my wound, tired, hungry and weak from loss of blood," Smith wrote that he was unable to keep up with his regiment and fell in the mire near the Union picket line and was unable to move. As Hays checked on his pickets he spied the sergeant, put Smith on his horse and carried him down to the landing where a boatload of wounded was ready to sail to New York City. "To that act, I owe my life. Hays performed the service himself. I was a rare thing for an officer of his rank to do."

According to Standard History of Kansas and Kansans (Volume III) by William Elsey Connelley (1918), William H. Smith came to Kansas with his arm in a sling as a result of a wound received at Malvern Hill. He lived in the state for over half a century. Among his occupations were farmer, merchant, public official and banker.

Smith was born at West Lebanon on 3 December 1841, a son of Robert and Sarah (Wray) Smith. His grandfather, James Smith, immigrated from County Tyrone, Ireland. He grew up on a farm, but his father was also a stock buyer and merchant. Many of his brothers also served in the Civil War and later moved to Kansas. His brother James served three terms as Kansas Secretary of State.

Smith was a student in the Elders Ridge Academy until he left in the spring of 1860 to work as an oil prospector along the Little Kanawha River, now West Virginia. As war loomed, he returned to Elders Ridge, and with a group of neighbors enlisted in Company D. He was wounded at the battle of Gaines Mill, and at Malvern Hill on July 1, 1862, he was shot through the left shoulder. He lay wounded on the field for four days before he was picked up and given medical attention. Removed to Bedloe Island in New York harbor, he went on the operating table on 6 July. Thereafter for eight years , he carried his arm in a sling. Transferred to the Invalid Corps, his duties included the charge of the night nurses at Fort Schuyler, recruiting, and looking after prisoners. During the draft riot in New York City in 1863 he led a platoon that fought the rioters for several days.

After the war Smith returned to Elders Ridge briefly before enrolling in the Iron City Business College for three months. On 3 September 1865, he started west with his wife and arrived in Kansas ten days later, traveling by rail and on foot, where he joined his brothers James and Robert W.

Smith's first work in Marshall County, Kansas, was taking the scum off the boilers used for making sorghum. Other jobs included traveling salesman, cattle herding, and breaking the virgin sod of the prairie. In the fall of 1868 he was elected a member of the Legislature from Marshall County. In 1870 he was appointed deputy United States Marshal under Colonel Houston, and in that capacity took the census of the southern half of Marshall County. After serving again in the legislaturehe moved to Marysville, and served as postmaster for fourteen years. He was also a merchant, establishing the firm of Smith & Libby, selling groceries and farm implements and buying and shipping grain, and owned a farm of 160 acres a mile east of Marysville. On retiring from the office of postmaster, Smith was elected county treasurer. In 1890 he was appointed supervisor of the census of the fifth congressional district, and from 1902 to 1904 served as Secretary of the State Railroad Commission. One of the organizers of the Citizens State Bank of Marysville in 1907, he filled the position of president until he resigned on the first day of 1913. An active member of Lyons Post No. 9, Grand Army of the Republic, he served as its commander a number of terms. For thirty years he was a director of the Kansas State Historical Society and served as its president in 1902. He was an active Republican.

Smith appears to have been married twice but had no children. Smith may have been a close or distant cousin of John Henderson, who also served in Company D.

According to Bates, Smith was "Not on muster-out roll."


James J. Barrett | Corporal
Absent, sick at muster-out

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 20; Occupation: Farmer; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Black; Eyes: Brown; Complexion: Dark; Height: 5'7" CWVCF notes Barrett was discharged for disability.

The 1890 Veterans Schedules lists his widow as Bessie H. Barrett, who was then living in Kellersburg, Armstrong County.


Josiah J. Callen | Corporal
Promoted to Corporal, 1 July 1862. Mustered out with company, 13 July 1864.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 22; Occupation: Farmer; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Black; Eyes: Blue; Complexion: Fair; Height: 5'11 1/2"

Bates lists his first name as Joseph, but his pension index card and CWVCF indicate Josiah is correct first name. The 1890 Veterans Schedules lists his name as Josiah J. Callen. He was then living in Widnoon, Armstrong County. Under "Disability Incurred" the note is "Wounded both legs."


David P. Truitt | Corporal.
Promoted to Corporal, 10 December 1862 Mustered out with company, 13 July 1864.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 18; Occupation: Farmer; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Black; Eyes: Blue; Complexion: Fair; Height: 5'6"

Truitt died in 1896. According to his pension index card, at the time of his death he had a minor child, Florence P. Truitt. His widow was Elma S. Bruce.

Jefferson and David Truitt were brothers. In the 1850 Census for Madison Township, Armstrong County, Thomas J. (aged 13) and David R. N. Truitt (aged 9) are two of the children of Anderson and Sarah Truitt.


Wesley K. Dillon | Corporal
Promoted to Corporal, 1 August 1862. Wounded at the battle of Spottsylvania Court-House, Va., 12 May 1864. Mustered out with company, 13 July 1864. 

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 15; Occupation: Student; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Light; Eyes: Blue; Complexion: Fair; Height: 5'5". Roll indicates last name spelled Dillen.

Was wounded at the battle of Spottsylvania Court-House by bullets and buckshot in his left lower leg and confined to the hospital from 14 May to 1 September 1864, when he was mustered out, receiving an honorable discharge.]

Son of Reuben Dillon, also of Company D.

Dillon was born in Wheeling, Va. (now West Virginia), 27 June 1846, but moved with his family while at an early age to Pennsylvania, to Minnesota after the death of his mother, and back to Pennsylvania in 1860. After the war he returned to school and earned a teaching certificate. After a few years of teaching school, he became connected with the Dixmont (Pa.) Hospital for the Insane and continued there till 1874. He then attended Western Reserve University, in Cleveland, earning a two-year medical degree and served in positions in hospitals for the insane in Danville, Pa, Morristown, NJ, and Iowa. He became Assistant Supervisor of the Iowa State Hospital for the Insane at Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, in 1885.

Dillon a Republican and a Mason.

According to pension index card, Dillon died in or before 1916 in Illinois. His widow was Flora G. Dillon.


George W. Stiffey | Corporal
Promoted to Corporal, 1 August 1862 Mustered out with company, 13 July 1864.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 21; Occupation: Farmer; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Brown; Eyes: Blue; Complexion: Fair; Height: 6'

Pension index record for Stiffey indicates he returned to Pennsylvania and lived there at least until 1891. The 1890 Veterans Schedules lists his home as Brattonville, Armstrong County. "None" was listed as "Disability Incurred."

Jeremiah A. Millinger | Corporal
Transferred to Company K of the 134th Pennsylvania Volunteers after just over a year of service in the 62d. 

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 28; Occupation: Carpenter; Residence: Butler Co.; Hair: Brown; Eyes: Brown; Complexion: Dark; Height: 5'2 1/2". [Record for Jeremiah Millinger of the 134th lists "Age at Enrollment: 20"]

Name spelled both Mellinger and Millinger. Last name spelled Mellinger in Bates. Listed as "Not on muster-out roll." In the 134th P. V. roster he is listed as Jere. A. Millinger. There, he mustered in as Sergeant on 10 August 1862. He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant on 1 September 1862 and was wounded at Fredericksburg on 13 December 1862. He was discharged for medical reasons on 1 March 1863 and filed for an invalid pension on 1 April 1865.


William Turney | Corporal.
Promoted to Corporal, date unknown. Transferred as a private on 29 September 1864 to Company K of the 7th Pennyslvania Cavalry (80th Pennsylvania Volunteers), He was discharged by general order 23 June 23 1865.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 20; Occupation: Blacksmith; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Auburn; Eyes: Blue; Complexion: Fair; Height: 5'8". CWVCF record for William Terney is a see reference to William Turney.

Lsted as William Terney in the 7th Pa. Cavalry roster. The 1890 Veterans Schedules lists his home as Brockwayville, Jefferson County. "Bronchitis and Rheumatism" were listed as "Disability Incurred."

According to pension index record, he died in or before 1894 in Pennsylvania. His widow was Rachel M. Turney.

Arthur C. Cassady | Corporal
Wounded in the Wheatfield at Gettysburg and had his arm amputated. He was mustered out from the York PA hospital in September 1863.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 24; Occupation: Artist; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Brown; Eyes: Blue; Complexion: Fair; Height: 5'10"

Name spelled Cassady in Bates and the 1890 Veterans Schedules, but the family spells the name Cassedy. In 1890, his home was listed as Smicksburg, Indiana County. Under "Disability Incurred" the note indicates "Loss of left arm."

Listed as "Not on muster-out roll" in Bates. 

Thanks to John Postage for information about his great great grandfather.


William S. Doutt | Corporal
Veteran volunteer. Promoted to Corporal, 29 March 1862. Transferred to Company A, 155th P. V., 3 July 1864, serving as a private. Transferred to Company I, 191st P. V., 2 June 1865. Mustered out 28 June 1865.

Listing in Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866 provides no additional information.

According to the 1850 Census, William Doutt was then a 15 year old stone mason living at home in Brady's Bend (Perry Township), Pa (Armstrong County). The Doutt family is missing in 1860 census. Born in Pa. His father, John, was born in England. Twenty years later he was still in Brady's Bend as a plasterer, living with his wife Elizabeth and four children.

His widow, Elizabeth A. Doutt, filed for a widow's pension in 1919.


Martin McCanna | Corporal
Resigned to become Captain of Company B, 74th P. V.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment (as Captain of the 104th on 15 March 1865): 30; Residence: Armstrong Co.

Listed in Bates as "Not on muster-out roll."

The records are unclear, but what seems to have happened was that while at Camp Orr, outside of Kittanning, Martin M'Canna, after less than a months service with the 62d, mustered in on 14 August as 1st Lieutenant of Company B, 74th P. V. It seems that when McCanna left Company D for his advancement, the paperwork went missing. McCanna became Captain of Company B in 26 December 1862. Mustered out at expiration of his term, 4 November 1864, Captain Martin McCanna, with Lieutenant Joel Crawford, after their term of service in the 78th had expired, recruited volunteers in Armstrong County for a new company. According to Robert Walker Smith's History of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, the company was mustered into the 104th P. V. on 15 March 1865 to serve for one year, but actually served for only a little over six months.

His record in the pension file does not list the 62d. The 1890 Veterans Schedules lists his name as McCanna, with no mention of the 62d, and his home as Knox, Clarion County.

Also serving in the 78th were Corporate William McCanna and Private Barnabas McCanna. Barnabas and Martin were first names in several generations of McCannas who settled in Clarion County.

The 1910 Census lists Martin McCanna, aged 76, living in Kittanning with his brother Wilson O. Mccanna. Two online family trees indicate Martin McCanna, born in 1833 or 1834, died in Brookville, Jefferson County, in 1911.

John B. Buckley | Corporal
Received a bayonet wound above the right eye during the battle of Chancellorsville on 3 May 1863. Died 17 May 1863. Buried in Military Asylum Cemetery, D.C.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: Age at Enrollment: 22; Occupation: Carpenter; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Brown; Eyes: Blue; Complexion: Fair; Height: 5'10"; Remarks: (Died 5-17-63 Buried in Mil Asy Cem D.C. Bates).

Buckley was from Madison Township, Armstrong County. The 1860 Census indicates that Buckley was not married. He was living with his father James and his mother Hannah Buckley.  
 
After being wounded at Chancellorsville, on 9 May Buckley was admitted to Finley U. S. General Hospital in Washington, D.C. A description of his surgery can be found in The Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion. (1861-1865.) Part I, Volume II, pg. 32. The military asylum cemetery in which he is buried is now called the United States Soldiers’ and Airmen’s Home National Cemetery. Buckley is buried in plot 4557.

Promotion to Corporal not listed in Bates, but that rank is given in the Medical and Surgical History.

Thanks to Gordon Paul Buckley for additional information about Corporal Buckley.


Musicians

Following regulations, the company should have had one or two musicians, but Bates listed none. Civil War Veterans' Card File, however, indicates that both Sutton and Watson mustered in as Musicians.


Robert Sutton
Mustered out with company, 13 July 1864.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: M.I: As Mus.; Age at Enrollment: 18; Occupation: Boatman; Residence: Armstrong Co.; Hair: Light; Eyes: Blue; Complexion: Fair; Height: 5' 5 1/2"

Mustered in as Musician; mustered out as a Private, according to the "United States National Archives. Civil War Service Records [database on-line]."

The 1890 Veterans Schedules lists his rank as Musician and his home in 1890 as Brady's Bend, Armstrong County.


portrait of John M. WatsonJohn M. Watson
Mustered out with company, 13 July 1864.

Civil War Veterans' Card File, 1861-1866: M.I: As Mus.; Age at Enrollment: 21; Occupation: Farmer; Residence: Indiana Co.; Hair: Black; Eyes: Black; Complexion: Dark; Height: 5'10"

Mustered in as Musician; mustered out as a Private, according to the "United States National Archives. Civil War Service Records [database on-line]."

For full information, see his entry as a private.


Notes

Thumnail images on this page are all links to larger portraits. All portraits and signatures on this page or linked from this page are available courtesy of Will & Lynn Gorges' Civil War Battleground Antiques

NOTE: Armstrong County Pennsylvania Genealogy Project includes a transcription of Robert Walker Smith's History of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania (Chicago: Waterman, Watkins & Co., 1883), which contains information about the 62d Pennsylvania. Unfortunately the roster for Company D listed there is incomplete, and information concerning Company G is inaccurate. The roster is for Company G of the 63d Pennsylvania, not the 62d. I don't know whether the error is in the original or the transcription.

The Veteran Reserve Corps, originally called the Invalid Corps, was the military body to which soldiers were transferred when they were not healthy enough to be sent back to their original unit, but not sick or disabled enough to be sent home.

Sources

Bates, Samuel Penniman. History of Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1861-5. Volume III. Harrisburg: B. Singerly, state printer, 1869-71. -- available online through University of Michigan's Making of America series.

All portraits, except as those noted, are courtesy of Will & Lynn Gorges' Civil War Battleground Antiques from a photo album once owned by Company D member John M. Watson. ALERT: THIS PHOTO ALBUM HAS BEEN STOLEN!


Back to the main Pennsylvania 62d Infantry Regiment page?


This page authored and maintained by John R. Henderson ( jhenderson @ icyousee . org), Lodi, NY.
Last modified: 20 December 2013.
John R. Henderson's grandfather, John G. Henderson, had an uncle, John Henderson, a resident of Elders Ridge in Indiana County, who was a soldier in Company D.
URL: http://www.icyousee.org/pa62d/d.html